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A journey through utterly breathtaking landscapes, fascinating cultures and awesome animal environments. We reveal far-flung destinations and bring weird and wonderful worlds right into your living room.

Tamara Bunke was the East German spy at Che Guevara’s side. As a guerrilla, she was ambushed and shot to death in Bolivia in 1967. The life of Tamara Bunke is full of mystery and contradictions because in the GDR her biography was falsified, altered and documents...

Mission Che Guevara, the German woman who became his destiny, ZDFinfo, 2017

Tamara Bunke was the East German spy at Che Guevara’s side. As a guerrilla, she was ambushed and shot to death in Bolivia in 1967. The life of Tamara Bunke is full of mystery and contradictions because in the GDR her biography was falsified, altered and documents destroyed. The dispute over how long she worked for the “Stasi” is still going on today.  What is certain is that Tamara Bunke left the GDR in secret in 1961 to be reunited with Che Guevara in Cuba, who she met in Leipzig, Germany while she was working as an interpreter. The Cuban intelligence service trained her to be an agent so she could be sent to La Paz to support Che Guevara’s guerilla war. Tamara Bunke was an exceptional spy but she blew her cover to be with him and his guerilla fighters against his own wishes. Was it treason, love or passion for the revolution? The author Dietrich Duppel tries to answer this question. He conducts countless interviews with friends, enemies and companions of Tamara Bunke. Among others, he interviews the CIA agent Felix Rodriguez, who was the last person to interrogate Che Guevara;  Fidel Castro’s top diplomat Raúl Roa Kouri and with the Cuban ex-intelligence officer Juan Antonia Menier, who claims: “We turned Tamara Bunke.” With reenactments and thus far undisclosed documents the documentary portrays a fascinating and nonetheless mysterious woman.

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In this documentary blogger and internet expert Sascha Lobo deals with the effect of social media on society and explains the internets’ complexity.  These mechanisms are key factors potentially affecting this year´s general election in Germany.Eight...

Man!pulated - with Sascha Lobo, ZDFneo, 2017

In this documentary blogger and internet expert Sascha Lobo deals with the effect of social media on society and explains the internets’ complexity.  These mechanisms are key factors potentially affecting this year´s general election in Germany.Eight protagonists who all use social media differently are asked to participate in various experiments. Assisted by scientist Dr. Sandra Matz from the University of Cambridge, Sascha Lobo shows the viewer how they can protect themselves against the multi-layered mechanisms of manipulation in the net.The multi-platform project consists of four parts:

1. Power and majority: How are convictions and majorities created  in social media?

2. Maximum attention: Who attracts most attention generates higher traffic on his webpage and therefore more advertising money.

3. “Likes” and the consequences: Dr. Matz demonstrates how well computers are able to analyze our digital footprint and how this could be abused.

4. Filterbubbles: Especially online, it’s easy to build our own small world. Only what interests us will appear in our timeline. Any dislikes are filtered out. Sascha Lobo wants to find out how filterbubbles created in the net transfer to the real world. He participates in a manifestation of the right and of the left wing political movement…

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The documentary tells the story of an unknown piece of history based on the life stories of three deserters (Victor Grossman, Jan Stoops, and James W. Pulley): The desertion of more than 100 NATO soldiers to eastern Germany, at that time of the German Democratic Republic. In...

Behind Enemy Lines NATO-deserters in the GDR, ZDFinfo, 2015

The documentary tells the story of an unknown piece of history based on the life stories of three deserters (Victor Grossman, Jan Stoops, and James W. Pulley): The desertion of more than 100 NATO soldiers to eastern Germany, at that time of the German Democratic Republic. In the eyes of the army deserters are traitors. They are punished severely. Still, there are deserters in every army. But why did so many NATO soldiers flee to the GDR in the 50s and 60s? While hundreds of thousands wanted to get to West, approximately 150 NATO soldiers deserted to the GDR. In the West they had freedom and prosperity – why then did they flee to real-life socialism? What was their motivation? What happened to them? To train the deserters to accept a socialist world view, they were educated and reviewed in an art nouveau mansion in Bautzen because everybody was under suspicion of spying. However, not only did the “Stasi” monitor the deserters for years, even the FBI did.  For more than 40 years they were not allowed to return home. They had to live a life behind enemy lines. This documentary portrays the fate of the deserters with thus far unknown FBI records, numerous documents, reenactments and interviews given by experts.

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Animal rights activist and ZDF science presenter Dirk Steffens takes a look at the most popular dish on German dining tables: chicken.  Every one of us eats approximately 11.7 kilos a year – that is about eight chickens and nearly ten times more than 60 years ago...

Project Chicken Farm, 2 episodes, ZDF, 2014

Animal rights activist and ZDF science presenter Dirk Steffens takes a look at the most popular dish on German dining tables: chicken.  Every one of us eats approximately 11.7 kilos a year – that is about eight chickens and nearly ten times more than 60 years ago when the Germans loved to eat their Sunday roast chicken. The poultry industry not only delivers more and more chicken, but it has also become cheaper. Pet food which is made of chicken often costs more than chicken meat for humans.  In supermarkets, one kilo of chicken costs less than one kilo of cat food.  Why is that? Dirk Steffens gets to the bottom of the dumping prices: How does the poultry meat production in German chicken breeding facilities work? What does industrial livestock farming cost and why is free range meat nearly five times more expensive? And: What does all of this mean for the life of the animals?

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In the German Democratic Republic, the country run by a regime filled with informers educated their young people in a military tradition and had them march in parades. Anyone who didn’t follow orders was humiliated and bullied by the “Stasi” (East-German...

Secretly in the GDR, ZDFinfo, 2014

In the German Democratic Republic, the country run by a regime filled with informers educated their young people in a military tradition and had them march in parades. Anyone who didn’t follow orders was humiliated and bullied by the “Stasi” (East-German secret police). In the West young people protested against nuclear power plants and missile deployment. But even here the government had no understanding for change and protesters were often beaten up at demonstrations. Although most of the GDR citizens wanted to flee to the West, a small group of young men and woman secretly went over into the GDR: for communist cadre training at the Youth Academy Wilhelm Pieck, the highest education institute of the Free German Youth.  At the Bogensee, near Wandlitz, students from all around the world were trained in secret for the class conflict.  The author Dietrich Duppel was able to convince three former West comrades to tell the story of their experiences at the Youth Academy in front of a camera. These members of the Socialist German Worker Youth, also known as Marxist Student Union Spartacus, were in for a lot of surprises at the Free German Youth school and suffered a massive culture shock in the Worker and Peasant state as the bourgeois and stasi socialism did not at all fit the world view of the idealists from the West. However, back in the Federal Republic of Germany a number of them became officials of the German Communist Party and tried to gain influence in politics and the peace movement. But financed by the Socialist Unity Party of Germany, the Socialist German Worker Youth were destined to fail.

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In his two-part docu-drama, “Alfred Brehm – The Feelings of Animals”, TV scriptwriter  Kai Christiansen asks renowned animal research scientists the question: Do animals have individuality, do they  feel  as humans do? The movie follows Brehm...

Alfred Brehm - The Feelings of Animals, arte/NDR, 2013

In his two-part docu-drama, “Alfred Brehm – The Feelings of Animals”, TV scriptwriter  Kai Christiansen asks renowned animal research scientists the question: Do animals have individuality, do they  feel  as humans do? The movie follows Brehm on his expedition through Africa from 1847 till 1852, his work as a zoo director in Hamburg, Germany, and his life from childhood until his death in Thüringen, Germany. Actor Vladimir Burlakov plays Alfred Brehm and Roger Willemsen, making use of his unique and typically elegant style of language, narrates the movie.

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© Sarah Fischer

Presenter Markus Lanz sets off through Mongolia, an ancient land which lies between China and Russia. He meets some extraordinary people and lives with them in primeval conditions. It is a trip full of privation, with highs and lows, all experienced and reported by Markus Lanz...

© Sarah Fischer
© Sarah Fischer
© Sarah Fischer
© Sarah Fischer

Dreaming of Mongolia - with Markus Lanz, ZDF, 2012

Presenter Markus Lanz sets off through Mongolia, an ancient land which lies between China and Russia. He meets some extraordinary people and lives with them in primeval conditions. It is a trip full of privation, with highs and lows, all experienced and reported by Markus Lanz and his camera team.

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Whether in winter or summer, the Alps attract millions of tourists every year. But the masses of holidaymakers have drastically altered the unique mountain landscape. ‘The Mountains of the Germans’ shows the effect of this change on the people who live there....

The Mountains of the Germans, ZDF, 2012

Whether in winter or summer, the Alps attract millions of tourists every year. But the masses of holidaymakers have drastically altered the unique mountain landscape. ‘The Mountains of the Germans’ shows the effect of this change on the people who live there. Mountain innkeeper Silvia Huber, folk music star Hansi Hinterseer, and professionals of the mountain rescue service give an insight into their lives, and the meaning the mountains have for them.

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©  Marc Lorat

Television chef Tim Mälzer gets to the bottom of the widest range of food-related topics in his documentary. Ready-made meals, meat, various diets or fast-food are all inspected in minute detail. He exposes myths and clichés through self-tests and experiments, has...

©  Marc Lorat
©  Marc Lorat
©  Katarina Schickling
©  Marc Lorat

Germany eats... with Tim Mälzer, ARD/NDR, 6 episodes (Co-Producer)

Television chef Tim Mälzer gets to the bottom of the widest range of food-related topics in his documentary. Ready-made meals, meat, various diets or fast-food are all inspected in minute detail. He exposes myths and clichés through self-tests and experiments, has things explained by professors, and goes in search of the truth in discussions with the big food producers.

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© Maximilian Schecker

Markus Lanz explores the largest island on the planet – Greenland.  He takes the viewer with him to the most beautiful and isolated parts of the island, encountering hunters and indigenous people. Nowhere else in the world are Inuit traditions so alive today as on...

© Maximilian Schecker
© Maximilian Schecker
© Berti Kropac
© Maximilian Schecker

Dreaming of Greenland - with Markus Lanz, ZDF, 2010

Markus Lanz explores the largest island on the planet – Greenland.  He takes the viewer with him to the most beautiful and isolated parts of the island, encountering hunters and indigenous people. Nowhere else in the world are Inuit traditions so alive today as on this icy island between Europe and North America. In one of the most barren environments on earth, a culture has developed in which ownership plays a secondary role, and where the community has the highest value.

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© Tanja Timm-Bender

’What does Germany enjoy’ is a culinary and humorous journey to the most unusual  food culture spots in Germany, with Bernhard Hoecker and Tetje Mierendorf. Their tour takes them to the gastronomic highlights of the country: the highest-altitude food, the most...

© Tanja Timm-Bender
© Patrick Dosanjh
© Patrick Dosanjh
© Tanja Timm-Bender

What does Germany enjoy, ZDF, 2 episodes, 2010

’What does Germany enjoy’ is a culinary and humorous journey to the most unusual  food culture spots in Germany, with Bernhard Hoecker and Tetje Mierendorf. Their tour takes them to the gastronomic highlights of the country: the highest-altitude food, the most erotic food, the most innovative food, the most hidden food, the most lively cheese, and much more…

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‘Our Best Stars From The North’ is a series of lovingly-produced, high-quality portraits of Ina Müller, Karl Dall, Olli Dittrich, Carlo von Tiedemann and Otto Waalkes. Besides humour, high entertainment and unforgettable snatches from the archives, we show the...

Our Best Stars From The North, NDR, 6 episodes, 2010

‘Our Best Stars From The North’ is a series of lovingly-produced, high-quality portraits of Ina Müller, Karl Dall, Olli Dittrich, Carlo von Tiedemann and Otto Waalkes. Besides humour, high entertainment and unforgettable snatches from the archives, we show the subjects from a previously unknown perspective and hear from interesting people along the way.

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